There are 12498 changes meeting the criteria. To re-sort the list by a different column, click on the column's heading.

Code not ordered Name not ordered Description Change Type not ordered Change Date descending order
YF-3000.7740-250 Genital Herpes Remove "Cytomegalovirus" as a use reference. It seems that although CMV is in the herpesvirus family, it is not the same as genital herpes. A new term is available for the condition. CHANGE 06/04/20
TH-2900.1785 Disaster Related Cash Grants Programs that provide cash grants to businesses, individuals and families who have been affected by a major disaster or large-scale emergency including a public health crisis like a pandemic that disrupts the normal functioning of a community. Monies can generally be used to pay for temporary housing, housing repair or replacement, permanent housing construction, moving and storage, personal property replacement, medical and dental services, funeral and burial services, transportation assistance and other expenses not covered by insurance or other programs. Included are the FEMA Individuals and Households Program (a program jointly funded by the federal government and the state and administered by the state), stimulus packages approved by Congress and signed by the President, state supplemental programs, and disaster related cash grant programs offered by local government and private sector organizations. Also included is the web tool launched by the Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service that allows quick registration for payments for people who don't normally file a tax return. = Cash Grant Registration Web Tool NOTE: U.S. only change. The Canadian definition has not been modified. CHANGE 06/04/20
RP-5000.5000-020 ACEs /Toxic Stress Screening Services Programs that provide pediatric screening services that seek to identify situations in which young children are being exposed to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) such as physical or emotional abuse, chronic neglect, domestic violence, parental mental illness or a substance use disorder, exposure to violence, and/or the accumulated burdens of family economic hardship. Moderate, short-lived stress responses can promote emotional growth, but toxic outcomes may result when a child experiences strong, frequent and/or prolonged adversity or trauma without adequate support from adults to help them cope. Screening helps to identify possible risk factors for future medical and mental health conditions, increases communication with families, provides resources to promote resiliency and mitigate the impact of ACEs, and monitors for stress-related health problems in at-risk patients and family members. Screening is also a means to identify children who would benefit from preventive measures that promote positive environmental influences and, if need be, therapeutic interventions. Routine anticipatory guidance encourages positive parenting, strengthens support for families, builds resilience and helps develop the buffers required to avoid toxic stress. Targeting the caregiver's stressors and improving the caregiver's capacity to provide safe, stable and nurturing relationships may mitigate any toxic stress response in children. See also Toxic Stress Treatment Services (RP-6400.8000-850). = Adverse Childhood Experiences Screening Services = Toxic Stress Screening Services NEW 06/04/20
RF-2480 Gambling Related Telemedicine Services U.S. DEFINITION: Programs that use video conferencing or other telecommunication options (telephone-based care, web-based screening, web-based treatment, smartphone mobile applications) that allow real time communication between individuals who are having difficulty controlling their compulsion to gamble and a clinician at a distant site. Use of telemedicine increases the reach and access to treatments, and eliminates the need for an individual living in a rural area or another city to drive long distances to see their counselor. The chronic nature of addiction disorders calls for clinicians to stay connected with patients over extended periods of time. Face-to-face contacts between patients and clinicians are limited to scheduled appointments or group sessions. But counselors are often unavailable when they are most needed: outside the treatment setting, where patients make decisions about whether to go to the casino or dial up their favorite Internet gambling site. Patients in recovery can also access recovery supports where they can interact with a counselor or recovery support peer. CANADIAN DEFINITION: Programs that use video conferencing or other telecommunication options (telephone-based care, web-based screening, web-based treatment, smartphone mobile applications) that allow real time communication between individuals who are having difficulty controlling their compulsion to gamble and a clinician at a distant site. Use of telemedicine increases the reach and access to treatments, and eliminates the need for an individual living in a rural area or another city to drive long distances to see their counsellor. The chronic nature of addiction disorders calls for clinicians to stay connected with patients over extended periods of time. Face-to-face contacts between patients and clinicians are limited to scheduled appointments or group sessions. But counsellors are often unavailable when they are most needed: outside the treatment setting, where patients make decisions about whether to go to the casino or dial up their favorite Internet gambling site. Patients in recovery can also access recovery supports where they can interact with a counsellor or recovery support peer. See also Compulsive Gambling Service Provider Complaints (DD-1500.1725), Telemedicine (LV-8500), Telemedicine Services For Substance Use Disorders (RX-8450.8500), Telemental Health (RF-8385). = Telemedicine Services for Problem Gamblers NEW 06/04/20
PN-8100.4500-200 Emotions Anonymous Support Groups Change the term name to "Emotional Issues Support Groups". = Emotions Anonymous Support Groups CHANGE 06/04/20
LH-0500.0900-600 Plasma Donation Centers Change to "Plasma Donation Centers/Drives". Locations where people can come to donate plasma, the straw-colored liquid that carries the red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. The proteins and clotting factors in plasma are used to create products such as immunoglobin which provides a defense against infection, clotting factors which help people with hemophilia and others whose blood fails to clot normally, and plasma volume expanders which help people who have lost blood either from an injury or during surgery. Donors are generally compensated for their time with a cash payment. Also included are organizations that conduct campaigns which encourage volunteers to donate plasma for specific purposes, e.g., people who have had and recovered from the COVID-19 virus and are willing to donate plasma that may have antibodies that can be used to create plasma infusions which can be used to treat patients who are seriously ill with the virus. Until there is a vaccine, the infusions may be a tool that doctors can lean on, and a single donation can be used to treat several patients. See also Blood Drives (LH-0500.0900-180). NOTE: U.S. only. CHANGE 06/04/20
LF-4900.1562 COVID-19 Antibody Tests Commercially manufactured antibody tests available through health care providers and commercial laboratories that check for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in individuals. Antibody tests (sometimes referred to as "serology tests") look for the presence of antibodies, which are specific proteins created by the person's immune system in response to infections. A positive result indicates that the person was previously infected with the virus, even though they were never diagnosed with the virus and/or never felt sick. Individuals who take the test are being advised to talk with their health care provider about the results and the type of test that they took, and may get a suggestion from their provider that they take a second type of antibody test to see if the first test results were accurate. Antibody test results are especially important for detecting previous infections in people who had few or no symptoms, and have been used in surveillance studies to calculate the percentage of people in a particular community who have been infected in the past and may have some measure of immunity. However, they should not be confused with diagnostic tests which determine whether an individual has an active infection, nor should they be used to make any decisions about individuals, e.g., whether it is safe for them to return to work. There are questions about the validity of some of the available antibody tests (false positives and false negtives), and some official reports of infection levels combine diagnostic test figures with antibody test results creating an inaccurate picture of the actual infection rates in the community and how the virus is spreading through the population over time. Scientists do not know yet if the antibodies will protect the individual from reinfection or how long the protection might last, but are conducting research to answer those questions. See also Clinical Trials Research Projects (LT-1530.1550), COVID-19 Antibody Test Development (JP-1500.1520), COVID-19 Control (JP-1500.1700-150), COVID-19 Diagnostic Tests (LF-4900.1565), Diagnostic Blood Tests for Children's Inflammatory Illness (LF-4900.1710). = COVID-19 Serology Tests NEW 06/04/20
JP-1500.1520 COVID-19 Antibody Test Development Organizations that are working on development of a serology test that looks for an immune response to the COVID-19 virus in blood samples. The test takes a sample of a person's blood and looks for antibodies (small proteins created by a person's immune system during the process of fighting off a disease). A positive result indicates that the person was previously infected with the virus, even though they were never diagnosed with the virus and/or never felt sick. Scientists do not know yet if the antibodies will protect the individual from reinfection or how long the protection might last, but are conducting research to answer those questions. Anecdotal evidence from China, preliminary studies in animal models and experience from previous outbreaks (e.g., SARS and MERS) suggest that a person who has had and recovered from COVID-19 is protected from getting it again. Having a serologic test may provide the opportunity to tell, for example, whether health care workers have developed immunity making it safe for them to remain on the job. A serologic test also might be used to determine the levels of COVID-19-related antibodies in a person's blood ― information that may be useful in the experimental treatment known as convalescent plasma therapy. Plasma is the component of the blood with no blood cells. The idea behind this treatment, which involves giving patients an infusion of antibody-rich plasma from those who have recently recovered, is that COVID-19 antibodies might neutralize the virus or jump-start a patient's own immune response. What's clear is that serology will contribute to wide-ranging areas of COVID-19 diagnosis, treatment and research. Researchers will want to use serology to learn more about timing. For instance, how soon after infection do patients with COVID-19 develop antibodies? This information may help track the progress of the disease. How long do COVID-19 antibodies last in the body? The answer will be helpful in the development and scheduling of an eventual vaccine. Ultimately, serology will provide a crucial tool to track and address the pandemic and could give us a more accurate estimate of the number of people who have been infected. See also Clinical Trials Research Projects (LT-1530.1550), COVID-19 Antibody Tests (LF-4900.1562), COVID-19 Control (JP-1500.1700-150), COVID-19 Diagnostic Tests (LF-4900.1565), Diagnostic Blood Tests for Children's Inflammatory Illness (LF-4900.1710). = COVID-19 Related Serology Test Development NEW 06/04/20
DD-1500.1725 Compulsive Gambling Service Provider Complaints U.S. DEFINITION: Programs that accept and, where possible, attempt to resolve complaints regarding the licensing or certification; incompetence of staff; cleanliness, safety and adequacy of facilities and equipment; treatment of clients; breaches of confidentiality; unethical, improper or unprofessional conduct of personnel; or other inappropriate business practices of organizations that provide services for people who are unable to resist the impulse to gamble to the extent that gambling behavior compromises, disrupts or impairs personal, family or vocational pursuits and/or social and economic stability. CANADIAN DEFINITION: Programs that accept and, where possible, attempt to resolve complaints regarding the licensing or certification; incompetence of staff; cleanliness, safety and adequacy of facilities and equipment; treatment of clients; breaches of confidentiality; unethical, improper or unprofessional conduct of personnel; or other inappropriate business practices of organizations that provide services for people who are unable to resist the impulse to gamble to the extent that gambling behaviour compromises, disrupts or impairs personal, family or vocational pursuits and/or social and economic stability. See also Families/Friends of Individuals with a Gambling Addiction Support Groups (PN-8100.2000-250), Gambling Addiction Counseling (RP-1400.8000-250), Gambling Addiction Helplines (RP-1500.1400-240), Gambling Addiction Prevention Programs (RR-5150.5000-250), Gambling Addiction Relapse Prevention (RR-2500), Gambling Addiction Screening (RP-5000.5000-250), Gambling Addiction Support Groups (PN-8100.0500-250), Gambling Regulation (DF-8000.3000), Gambling Related Residential Treatment Facilities (RM-7000.2500), Gambling Related Telemedicine Services (RF-2480), Gambling Self Exclusion Programs (DF-8000.3010). = Gambling Addiction Service Complaints NEW 06/04/20
TD-1400.0400 Arts/Humanities Councils Add "Arts Councils" as a new use reference. CHANGE 06/03/20

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